Tag Archives: apple

Recipe: Apple Cinnamon Snickerdoodles

4 Sep

Sadly summer is over for another year and at least here in Ottawa, the weather is already starting to cool off. The one good thing is that I didn’t feel bad about turning my oven on to make these very fall-style treats.

These cookies are chewy on the inside (thanks to the apple) and crunchy on the outside (thanks to the cinnamon sugar coating). They make a great after school snack for kiddos and a tasty breakfast for people who like to eat cookies before noon. I’m not naming any names.

Apple Cinnamon Snickerdoodles

Apple Cinnamon Snickerdoodles | baconavecbacon.com

1/2 cup hard margarine, softened*
1 cup white sugar
1 egg
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
1 medium apple, peeled and grated
2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon salt

Cream the margarine and sugar until fluffy. Beat in the egg and the vanilla. Fold in the grated apple. Sift together all the dry ingredients and gently combine with the wet ingredients.

Use a medium cookie scoop to make 1/2 inch balls of the dough and roll them well in a mixture of cinnamon and sugar. Place them on a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper and gently press down with a fork. If you’d like you can sprinkle a bit more of the cinnamon sugar mix on each cookie.

Bake at 375 degrees for approximately 14 minutes.

 

* A note on margarine… Hard margarine is not the spreadable kind that comes in a tub. As per a previous post, I like to use Imperial brand. Soft margarine contains too much water which will result in flat cookies. You can opt to use butter but I haven’t tested this recipe with it.

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Recipe: Quick Cheese Danish

14 Dec

Many, many moons ago I had a pretty awesome highschool history teacher. ‘Mr. Mac’ was a hulk of a man, a war veteran and totally no-nonsense. There are a lot of great Mr. Mac stories, most of them involve him disparaging disruptive students, however one day he came to class with a huge smile on his face which was definitely not the norm.

Standing at the front of the room Mr. Mac announced, “Class, I’ve discovered a new taste sensation: the danish.” He went on to talk about this awesome danish he had at the cafeteria for about five minutes. It was weird but I can definitely appreciate how discovering something new and tasty can really make your day.

This danish will certainly turn frowns upside down. In fact, I might make two of these for Christmas morning as they’re really quick to prepare and would go great with a warm mug of hot chocolate or cup of coffee. The version I made is blackberry, but this would be equally good with raspberries, lemon filling or some warm apple topping.

Quick Cheese Danish
(from Lauren’s Latest)

Quick Cheese Danish | baconavecbacon.com

1 tube Pillsbury crescent rolls (I’ve used both the regular and low fat with equal success)
8 ounces cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3 tablespoons all purpose flour
1 cup fruit/filling

For the icing:
1/2 cup powdered sugar
2 tablespoons milk or cream
1/8 tablespoon vanilla

Preheat your oven to 375 degrees.

Blend the cream cheese, sugar, vanilla and flour together. Set aside. Mix together the icing ingredients and set that aside too.

Take some parchment paper and place it on a cookie sheet. Roll the crescents out on the parchment without separating them. Go over the seams and squish them together lightly if they’ve separated a bit. You should have one long strip of dough.

Spread the cheese mixture down the center in about a 2 inch strip. Place the berries (or whatever filling you’re using) on top of the cheese.

Now take a sharp knife and cut 1/2 inch strips along both sides. Fold these dough ‘arms’ over top of the filling, alternating sides so you get a bit of a braid pattern. It doesn’t have to be perfect so don’t fuss too much.

Place into the oven and bake for 15-20 minutes or until golden brown.

Remove from the oven and let cool. (This part is very very hard because you really just want to immediately shove it in your face.)

Drizzle liberally with the icing and cut into strips.

I have no idea if this keeps well because I’ve never had any leftovers to keep. It’s probably best then if you just have that second piece instead of hoping it’ll be OK tomorrow.

Recipe: Baked Apple Spice Donuts

16 Sep

When I was in New York last weekend there were boxes of apple cider sugar coated donuts lining the entry way. I managed to resist them at the time, but with spiced dessert recipes everywhere on Pinterest, resistance became futile. Then I saw this Baked Apple Cider Donut Holes recipe from Feastie and I knew I had to give them a try. I tweaked a few things, and opted to make them in my handy dandy donut pans so I could experience them in their full donut-y splendor.

I delivered one downstairs to Mr. Bacon when it was fresh from the oven and he yelled back upstairs, “Oh my god these are good!” I consider that a success.

Apple Spice Donuts


2 cups flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 1/2 teaspoons baking soda
1/2 teaspoons salt
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
1 large egg
2/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup apple butter
1 tsp vanilla extract
1/3 cup honey
1/3 cup apple juice (or apple cider if you have it)
1/3 cup plain Greek yogurt
2 Tbsp canola oil

2 Tbsp unsalted butter
1/4 cup sugar
1 Tbsp cinnamon

In a large bowl, combine the dry ingredients. In a separate bowl, combine the wet ingredients and mix well. Add the wet to the dry and stir just until combined; a few small lumps are OK.

Spray your donut pans with non-stick spray and transfer the batter into a large ziplock bag. Cut the tip off and pipe the batter into the wells of the donut pan (it’s too messy to try to scoop it). Make sure not to overfill or you’ll lose the ‘holes’ and you’ll wind up with mini bunt cakes.

Bake for approximately 9 minutes at 400 degrees.

When they’re done let them sit and cool for a minute then paint each one very lightly with melted butter before tossing in a bag of cinnamon and sugar.

Eat right away, or let them cool on a wire rack before storing. It’s best not to cover them too tightly so they don’t develop condensation.